According to the DVLA, in 2019, an average of 33 new drivers lost their licence everyday in the UK. That’s more than 12,000 licences revoked from drivers within two years of passing their test. In a single year. That’s a massive figure. And when you think of all the time and effort – and money – that you put into learning to drive, it seems kind of stupid, doesn’t it?  So, what’s the reason for this figure? Why are so many new drivers having their licences revoked?

Why Are New Drivers Losing Their Licences?

Road Traffic (New Drivers) Act 1995

In 1995, the UK government made the decision to try to reduce the fatalities and casualties amongst new drivers. Consequently, the Road Traffic (New Drivers) Act 1995 came into effect on the 1st of June 1997. Legislating that if a newly qualified driver collects 6 or more penalty points within 2 years of passing their driving test, their licence could be revoked.

Fair enough. But what are young drivers doing to collect all those points?

The most common driving offences causing new drivers to lose their licence

Accident offences

There are various actions that fall into the category of accident offences. They range from failing to stop at the scene of an accident, to failing to provide a sample to the police. While accidents can be frightening and understandably induce panic, if you’re involved in accident, it’s important that you take responsibility. Even if you believe that you are not at fault.

Motorway offences

There are a number of things that common sense dictates that you simply shouldn’t do on a motorway. These also happen to be the things that it’s illegal to do. Including:

  • Reversing
  • Driving or stopping on the central reservation
  • Making a U-turn
  • Driving the wrong way
  • Driving in a prohibited lane
  • And stopping on the hard shoulder when there is not an emergency.

Pedestrian crossing offences

This one is fairly obvious. On pedestrian crossings, pedestrians have right of way. If you fail to stop when someone is trying to cross, you have committed an offence.

Careless driving

Careless driving is essentially driving without paying dur care and attention. This might be because you’re talking to a passenger, eating, fiddling with your radio, or – most commonly – doing something with your phone. Anything that means you’re not fully focussing on the act of driving falls within this category.

Exceeding speed limits

You don’t need an explanation here!

Construction and use offences

If your car is not fit to drive, you shouldn’t be driving it. That includes bald tyres, dodgy exhaust, faulty lights, or anything else that may impact your car’s performance. You also shouldn’t use your car inappropriately. This can include carrying too many people, or too heavy a load.

Failing to comply with traffic signs and directions

Traffic lights and road signs are there for a reason. They do not provide optional advice. You are obliged to adhere to them. If you don’t, you’re putting yourself and others at risk. And risking losing your licence.

Reckless and dangerous driving

There are so many potential actions that fall within this category. But to summarise, if you’re behaving like an idiot behind the wheel, you’re going to lose your licence. Even if you think you’re ‘just having a laugh’.

Driving under the influence of drugs or drink

Again, no explanation needed. Just don’t do it.

Insurance offences

If you are found to be driving without insurance, you could receive a fixed penalty of £300 and 6 penalty points. If the case goes to court, the repercussions could be a lot more serious.

Theft or unauthorised taking of a vehicle

And to finish, another no-brainer!

Keeping hold of your driving licence isn’t a hard thing for a new driver to do. You just have to be sensible. Don’t act the fool. Don’t take risks. Drive safely. Leave your phone out of sight. And do the right thing. Basically, keep on doing what your driving instructor told you to do, and you’ll never have to sit through another driving test again.

Looking for driving lessons in the West Midlands? Contact DGN today.