Motoring Offences Prosecution Stats

Motoring Offences Prosecution Stats

The number of prosecutions for all motoring offences increased by 4.5% over the last year according to the latest figures from the Ministry of Justice.

The number of prosecutions rose from 566,000 in 2013 to 591,000 in 2014 and the largest increases were seen in speed limit offences (a 26% increase in prosecutions from 127,000 in 2013 to 159,000 in 2014) and vehicle insurance offences (an 8% increase in prosecutions from 134,000 in 2013 to 144,000 in 2014).

The majority of the most serious motoring offences saw decreasing prosecutions over the last year, but causing death by dangerous driving saw an increase from 144 prosecutions in 2013 to 176 in 2014, reversing the decreasing trend observed since 2007. Causing death by careless driving saw a decrease from 234 in 2013 to 205 in 2014.

Prosecutions for causing serious injury by dangerous driving (introduced as an offence for the first time in December 2012) more than doubled, from 92 prosecutions in 2013 to 212 in 2014.

However, cycling charity CTC claimed that the number of drivers found guilty of “any causing death” offence in England and Wales dropped by 11% between 2013 and 2014, even though the number of people killed on the roads has recently shown an upward trend.

The charity pointed out that as a whole 315 drivers were convicted of causing death driving offences last year – an 11% fall compared with the 355 convictions for these offences in 2013 even though Great Britain as a whole saw a 1% increase in the year to September 2014 over the corresponding period a year earlier (1,730 fatalities compared with 1,711).

On its news blog, CTC’s campaigns and policy information co-ordinator Cherry Allen wrote: “CTC’s Road Justice campaign has long been concerned that the justice system is failing to take road crime as seriously as it should – and particularly that roads policing us bearing the brunt of cuts to overall police numbers. So any sign that drivers who kill are becoming more likely to escape prosecution and conviction is deeply worrying.”