Well, here we are again. Another lockdown and more learner drivers looking for ways to keep the momentum going without access to driving lessons. Déjà vu, anyone? Back in November, we posted our top tips for getting test-ready while lessons were on hold. With a potentially longer lockdown ahead, we thought it might be a good idea to add to that list, so you can fully make the most of your free time until you can get back on the road. So, here goes…

Five More Ways to Prepare for Your Driving Test in Lockdown

1. Prepare for your theory test

It’s easy to forget about your theory test when caught up in the excitement of learning to drive. But you can’t pass your practical test without it. And the prep is something that you can 100% do at home. So, as well as learning your highway code, try taking a couple of mock theory tests on the Government website. You could try your hand at the hazard perception test while you’re at it.

2. Show me, tell me

Show me, tell questions play a part of every practical driving test. They centre around the functionality of your vehicle and include topics such as, understanding how to check the tread of your tyres, and knowing how to use the rear demister. If you can get to know all of the potential show me, tell me questions, you’ll be well placed to sit your test when the opportunity arises.

3. Watch driving tutorials

If you’re already familiar with DGN, you’ll know all about our YouTube channel. Packed with videos of real driving lesson and mock test experiences, it’s a chance for those yet to begin lessons to see what they can expect when they start. For those who are already learning to drive, you can gain useful insight on how to navigate some of the more complex areas. It’s also encouraging to see that you’re not the only one who makes mistakes!

4. Get to grips with manoeuvres

OK, so you’re might not be getting back behind the wheel any time soon. But there’s no reason why you can’t get to grips with the theory of some of driving’s most dreaded manoeuvres. Reading and watching videos about parallel parking, three-point turns, bay parking, or anything else that might be worrying you – whether it plays a part in the driving test or not – is a great way to prepare for the real thing.

5. Fully familiarising yourself with the car’s cockpit

This one seems pretty obvious, but if you’re going to learn to drive, you need to know what you’re going to be looking at when driving. What do all the dials at the front of the car do? What information is on show? Where should you be looking to track your speed, monitor your fuel, check your car’s temperature? And what should you do when you first get in a car? Everyone knows the ‘mirror, signal, manoeuvre’ rule, but how about seatbelt safety, passenger care, and LADA (look, assess, decide, act)?

Lockdown will understandably feel like a real blow to anyone keen to gain their driving licence. But if you use the time well, in the long-term, it may turn out to be more of a blessing than a curse.

If you have questions about learning to drive, or would like to book lessons for the post-lockdown period, please just get in touch.